January 28, 2020

Exoskeletons and Ergonomics — What You Need to Know

Wearable exoskeletons and ergonomics are getting a lot of attention lately. Exoskeletal devices have already shown great promise and success as rehabilitation and disability solutions, and […]
January 4, 2019

Workplace Exercise Programs and Ergonomics

The industrial workplace is often littered with complaints of musculoskeletal dysfunction, limited physical function, and painful injuries. This creates increased costs associated with process disruptions, absenteeism, […]
April 16, 2014

Commentary: Ergonomics and its Relationship with Wellness

Ergoweb's Peter Budnick details his views on the emerging debates surrounding the relationships between ergonomics, a field he believes is fairly well defined, and wellness, a concept that is not well defined, though intuitively appealing. "Ergonomics and wellness complement each other, but they are not one and the same," he concludes.
December 20, 2013

Checking and Sorting

Common issues Constant bending to check orders Lifting, walking, carrying to sort orders Checking incoming materials often is done on the floor, which then usually requires […]
November 19, 2013

Effect of Cold Temperatures on Dexterity

As winter descends upon the northern hemisphere, it reminds us of the effects of temperature on human performance. We all know temperature can impair human abilities, […]
September 25, 2013

What Influences The Use of Lift & Assist Devices In Healthcare?

Gene Kay MS, CEA, and Peter Budnick, PhD, CPE 25th September, 2013 This article is reprinted with permission from The Ergonomics Report™ Archives, where it originally appeared […]
September 8, 2013

Force Guidelines

Common standards* (Most items apply to sustained work) Maximum two-handed lift (with vertical travel distance) 20 lbs Maximum two-handed carry (no vertical travel distance) 30 lbs […]
April 3, 2013

Stretching and Ergonomics

Why, when implemented in the workplace, do resolutions that encourage workers to partake in on-the-job exercise programs, install and use stretch-break reminder software at their computer workstations, or commit to a personal wellness plan, so often get confused with ergonomics?
March 13, 2013

We Told Them to Lift with Their Legs, But They Just Won’t Listen!

Common wisdom says we should lift with our legs, not our backs. Some companies mistakenly base much of their ergonomics strategy on training employees to "lift with your legs." This research study sheds light on why many people typically don't lift with their knees, and instead use a back-lift strategy. In this article, reprinted from The Ergonomics Report, study reviewer Peter Budnick offers his thoughts on how companies can apply this new knowledge.
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