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  • in reply to: Force limits for the thumb #40311

    slmurphey
    Participant

    Thanks, Kelly.  I think I looked at this but it didn't recommend a limit.  Did find the DOD Design Criteria Standards MIL-STD 1472F which lists force recommendations for thumb operated push buttons: 2.8 N (10 oz.) minimum, 23 N (80 oz.) maximum (for males). Here's a link to the document for anyone that might need it: 

    Department of Defense Design Criteria Standards; MIL-STD 1472F http://www.public.navy.mil/navsafecen/Documents/acquisition/MILSTD1472F.pdf

    Susan L. Murphey BS, RDMS, RDCS, CECD

    in reply to: Ergonomics in Medicine and Healthcare – Reporter needs help #40556

    slmurphey
    Participant

    Hi Peter,

      Thanks for posting this.   I could also ramble on forever on this topic, but I’ll try to keep it relatively short and just include my contact info if the writer would like to chat more on the subject. 

      As you know, I’ve been working specifically in healthcare ergonomics for the past 10 years.  Tamara is spot on with her overview of the ergonomic challenges in healthcare.  Safe patient handling has received a lot of attention recently, as it should.  The issues of patient lifting and positioning affect a large population of caregivers.  But there are so many other areas in healthcare with WRMSD risks just as significant. 

       I’ve worked with numerous ultrasound departments with injury rates in excess of eighty percent.  Laboratory, food services, interventional radiology, mammography and surgical services are just a few of the many underserved areas in need of healthcare ergonomics.  Currently I’m working with an Environmental Services department that has the highest number of injury claims for their facility, even though they only represent 3% of the total workforce.  As with Pam’s group, the largest risk in this group is related to handling soiled linen.

      In terms of medical devices and equipment, I would say the response has been slow by manufacturers to incorporate ergonomics into their product development.  In my opinion, this is largely due to the fact that those making the buying decisions don’t recognize the need for ergonomic features to protect their staff from injury.  Until ergonomics becomes part of the buying decision, manufacturers will be slow to embrace it in the design of their medical devices and equipment.  Think of what a difference we could make if every capital equipment purchase had to be evaluated for ergonomic benefit!

      In industries such as medical sonography, where attention has been drawn to the issues of work-related injury, manufacturers have been quick to jump on the bandwagon and make design changes.  I would say most of the OEMs I’ve worked with in product design for ultrasound related equipment have been driven to make design changes by the marketability of equipment with ergonomic features.  This was directly the result of attention being drawn to the issue of WRMSD among sonographers.  Similarly, we’ve seen an influx of SPH equipment on the market since the introduction of SPH legislation.

      Alas, we still find ourselves surfing the net looking for some random product we can modify to suit our needs in those underserved areas of healthcare ergonomics.  Thanks for drawing attention to this issue.

     Kind regards,

      Susan Murphey, Essential Ergonomics

      (206) 365-5253

     

     





    Susan L. Murphey BS, RDMS, RDCS, CECD

    in reply to: Professional Liability Insurance #40573

    slmurphey
    Participant

    Gary,

      Try




    this group:

    Aon / Affinity Insurance Services, Inc.

    159 East County Line Road

    Hatboro, PA 19040





    http://www.aon.com

     





    Susan L. Murphey

    Essential Ergonomics, LLC

     

     

     

    Susan L. Murphey BS, RDMS, RDCS, CECD

    in reply to: Ergonomic curriculum for elementary education #39467

    slmurphey
    Participant

    Good morning,

    The Puget Sound Chapter of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society is in the process of developing an ergonomics for schools program called Technically Cool Computing.  I am leading the pilot program with help from PSHFES members.  Our goal is to develop a curriculum that will provide computer ergonomics information to schools, as well as


    volunteer opportunities for PSHFES members and community outreach.  We just had our first run of the pilot this week with a class of 4th graders, and it was a great success.  I think we learned as much as they did!  We’ll go back and tweak the program and run another pilot, and continue the process until we get a program that we feel could be universally applied to a variety of demographics.

    You can find more information on the program at http://www.pshfes.org/news.htm or feel free to contact me.  I’d be happy to share what we’ve learned so far.

    Susan Murphey
    Community Projects Chair & Past President, PSHFES
    communityprojects@pshfes.org

    Susan L. Murphey BS, RDMS, RDCS, CECD

    in reply to: Medical E-Charting Issues #39339

    slmurphey
    Participant





    Yes!  There are huge issues, both from an ergonomic and interface perspective.   Unfortunately, these expensive purchases are often made by the hospital information technology department with no input from either the frontline worker or an ergonomics specialist.  As a result, the equipment is neither user friendly or ergonomic. Failure to consider the workflow and ergonomic impact of point-of-care computer systems and their set ups often results in inconsistent clinical use and dissatisfaction among workers.  Workarounds necessitated by cumbersome (technological) processes affect productivity, and quality of work due to inconsistent methodologies.  From an ergonomic standpoint, awkward or hard-to-use equipment limits the worker’s ability to perform at their best.  Planning should start well in advance of the capital equipment purchase, and include input from IT, the end-user, and an ergonomics specialist. 


    I hope that provides some food for thought.


    Susan






    Susan L. Murphey BS, CECD
    President, Essential Ergonomics
    Ph:  (206) 365-5253
    Email: susan.murphey@comcast.net
    http://www.essentialergonomics.com

        

     

    Susan L. Murphey BS, RDMS, RDCS, CECD

    in reply to: Positioning issues for Mammography Techs. #39242

    slmurphey
    Participant

    I’ve worked with many diagnostic imaging departments and have seen a growing list of problems among mammo techs as facilities move towards dedicated breast centers.

    I’ve had some success having the mammo tech use a height adjustable stool or saddle seat sit/stand stool on wheels.  It allows them keep their spine in a more upright position while positioning the patient.  It’s good that she’s using a foot control; many are also reaching up to controls on the side of the machine.

    Feel free to contact me offline if you have other questions.

    Regards,
    Susan





    Susan L. Murphey BS, RDMS, RDCS, CECD

    President, Puget Sound Human Factors and Ergonomics Society

    President, Essential Ergonomics, LLC

    Email:  susan.murphey@comcast.net

     

    Susan L. Murphey BS, RDMS, RDCS, CECD

    in reply to: Ergonomics for Medical Coders #44731

    slmurphey
    Participant

    I’d suggest looking into adjustable monitor arm mounts.  This would allow the user to adjust the height and distance of the monitors, i.e. bring them closer to be able to accommodate the use of a keyboard tray.  Ergotron has a nice series of both wall mount and desk mount styles, along with those that will hold two monitors.  I’m sure other companies offer something similar.

    I would also look at workstation set ups for PACS environments.  These workstations are very similar to what medical coders use and there are companies who offer a variety of workstation equipment.  (Some more ergonomic than others, but should at least give you some ideas and resources).

    Hope that helps!

    Susan Murphey
    susan.murphey@comcast.netSusan L. Murphey BS, RDMS, RDCS, CECD

    in reply to: Musculoskeletal problems in breast screening #38201

    slmurphey
    Participant

    We have also seen the same neck, wrist and hand issues in working with mammographers (radiographers) along with other complaints such as left shoulder pain from reaching up to the controls for compressing the breast tissue. Many of the risk factors are inherent in the current design of the equipment and we have started into discussions with the originial equipment manufacturers to consider design changes, but unfortunately, this is a slow process.

    The implementation of using a stool has helped to address the C-spine issues in our experience as well. Let me know if you need resources. Much of the hand and thumb issues are related to having to push against a fairly rigid spring to release the film cassette. More hand and wrist issues come into play as a result of the pinch grip used to pull the cassette out of the slot (film buckey) once it has been released. Some of this can be addressed through training such as using the heel of the hand rather than the thumb to release the film cassette. Other solutions rely on modifications to the equipment which may or may not require the involvement of the OEM, such as attaching a small handle to the side of the cassette to avoid the pinch grip, etc.

    I hope this helps.

    Susan

    in reply to: Research: “Sitting Straight ‘Bad for Backs’” #42846

    slmurphey
    Participant

    I agree. This same open hip angle can be achieved using a “saddle seat” type of chair. This may be a bit more practical application as it allows free movement to accomplish tasks, unlike the semi-reclining position.

    Susan

    in reply to: laser hair removal #42052

    slmurphey
    Participant

    Tim,

    We ran into similar circumstances with the heavy cables of diagnostic ultrasound instruments and cabled devices for breast biopsy. A counterbalance would be great, but wasn’t always practical or affordable in the clinical setting. We ended up developing a simple brace to support the cable(s) to take the torque off the operators arm and have had good results with it. As this ultimately became a commercial product, I don’t think I can post it here, but feel free to contact me directly if you want more info.

    By the way, we also ended up working with hair transplant surgeons who were working with folks who wanted MORE hair…hard to please everyone, I suppose.

    Best regards,

    Susan

    Susan L. Murphey BS, RDMS, RDCS, CECD

    Sound Ergonomics, LLC

    slmurphey@soundergonomics.com

Viewing 10 posts - 1 through 10 (of 10 total)