Training courses with and without certificates

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This topic contains 9 replies, has 6 voices, and was last updated by  mwh001 7 years, 4 months ago.

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  • #37169

    Rick Goggins
    Participant

    I got a request recently from a massage practitioner looking for information on short-courses, preferably ones that result in a certification of some type, on performing basic ergonomics evaluations. Is anyone aware of good courses out there for someone at this level? Massage practitioners typically have a really good understanding of the musculoskeletal system, but are going to vary widely in their educational background otherwise.

    I’d prefer courses that are pretty realistic in what they promise you’ll be able to do after attending them (i.e., they don’t “oversell” themselves). Thanks,

    #42790

    SchultzDavidR
    Participant

    I would contact your local state safety chapter if you have one or the National Safety Council in Itasca, IL.

    #42792

    admin
    Keymaster

    Rick,

    I would look the credentials of the trainer first; over here that has some bearing on whether the training certificate can truly be regarded as a “qualification” (or whether it has any legal standing at all for that matter).

    By the way, has there been any talk States-side about State governments establishing registration boards in the “health professions” for qualified professionals so that their potential clients can find out which of the “professionals” really do have the necessary qualifications? There has been a lot of talk about that here in NSW (especially re radiographers and so-called professional beauty therapists) and I can’t help wondering how long it will be before this sort of thing is compulsory for rehab and ergonomics the way media coverage and litigation are heading.

    Regards,

    David McFarlane

    Ergonomist, WorkCover NSW

    Disclaimer

    Any recommendation concerning the use or representation of a particular brand of product in this document or any mention of them whatsoever (whether this appears in the text, illustrations, photographs or in any other form) is not to be taken to imply that WorkCover NSW approves or endorses the product or the brand.

    #42795

    peter.goyert
    Participant

    Rick,

    I would concur with DaveMac that the qualifications of the trainers need to be looked at. Roy Matheson and Associates has been providing basic ergonomic courses in the US for many years and does provide a certificate of completion/certification. Other basic ergonomic courses are provided in the US by Keith Blankenship also providing a certificate. ErgoRehab in St. Petersberg Florida has distance education courses covering ergonomics. The February 2004 edition of The Ergonomics Report (vol 3 number 2) outlines known ergonomics-specific certificates and the requirements needed to atain these.

    regards

    Peter Goyert

    Senior Ergonomist

    WorkSafeBC

    #42798

    akg
    Participant

    Regarding the second part of the post, the Govt. of India is proposing to set up a “National Board of Accreditation and Certification of Institutions, Professionals and Services in Occupational Safety and Health”. A system already exists for accreditation of training courses.

    Ganguli

    #42801

    admin
    Keymaster

    Dear Ananda,

    Thanks for that snippet; more evidence that India is leading the world in many areas!

    I note that (like doctors) physiotherapists have physical hands-on one-to-one contact with their clients; hence one could argue that the rehab system implicates all rehabilitation providers including case managers and/or ergonomists or OTs who share any responsibility for that process (even if only indirectly via referrals).

    The failure to make a necessary referral to an appropriate therapist is often the missing link in the rehabilitation process. This is where professional negligence can be a problem; I apologise in advance to those who are all too familiar with this problem (and feel that it is in the area of the blindingly obvious) but some of the private feedback I have received shows that even some of the most seasoned OHS practitioners I hear from seem to have missed the point.

    Regards,

    David McFarlane

    Ergonomist, WorkCover NSW

    Disclaimer

    Any recommendation concerning the use or representation of a particular brand of product in this document or any mention of them whatsoever (whether this appears in the text, illustrations, photographs or in any other form) is not to be taken to imply that WorkCover NSW approves or endorses the product or the brand.

    #42802

    Rick Goggins
    Participant

    Thanks to everyone who has replied on this topic. There’s a lot of good advice there.

    Dave, in answer to your question, I know that our state has pretty extensive licensing requirements for health related professions such as massage practitioners, estheticians, hypnotherpists and acupuncurists. We even have a license for professional wrestlers. You can visit this web site for a full list: http://www.dol.wa.gov/listoflicenses.html.

    Our Department of Health also has a web site where you can search for a healthcare professional by their name or license number to make sure they’ve been behaving themselves.

    #42803

    admin
    Keymaster

    Rick

    Do these professionals need a “license number” in order to stay in business? This reminds me of the film about the “aluminum sidings” salesman stories of the sixties who were so amusingly lampooned in the Danny DeVito movie “Tin Men” (1987); they supposedly went out of business when they had their business licenses removed by the State of Maryland. Does anyone know if that was a true story?

    If only we could remove the business licenses of OHS repeat offenders (our slippery customers who always come up with some excuse for having workplaces that are death-traps and seem to regard fines as a mere on-cost)!

    Regards,

    Dave

    PS

    BTW “Tin Men” is one of my favourite movies and by some weird coincidence today is Danny DeVito’s birthday. Happy Birthday Danny!

    DisclaimerAny recommendation concerning the use or representation of a particular brand of product in this document or any mention of them whatsoever (whether this appears in the text, illustrations, photographs or in any other form) is not to be taken to imply that WorkCover NSW approves or endorses the product or the brand.

    #42804

    Rick Goggins
    Participant

    Hi Dave,

    Yes, to be legitimate you need to have a license number. I just had my massage license renewed, in fact. It just requires some continuing education and a few dollars to stay licensed.

    Take care,

    #42860

    mwh001
    Participant

    Some interesting discussion on this topic.

    I don’t know how you all feel, but I am personally very concerned when I hear that folks such as massage therapists want to go out an d start doing worksite evaluations. While massage therapists may know the musculoskeletal system very well, they basically receive a vocational degree to practice their art in a very specific way – one that does not include the myriad of other disciplines in which ergonomists must be proficient. I once had a client, a major hearing aid manufacturer that basically had massage therapy and chiropractic as the basis of their occupational safety program. Until I began consulting with them, they did not track injury metrics or perform process or worksite evaluations in any meaningful way. When someone reported health effects, off to the chiro they were sent!

    I think that courses such as the MAtheson, while can be a good intro to ergonomics(I took his course and John LaCourse PhD, CPE was a fine instructor) I did not really learn any in depth until I began taking graduate work in ergonomics, kinesiology and occupational safety. I think anyone who want to truly practice ergonomics well needs to do the same.

    To take it down a bit of a slippery slope, albeit with a valid message-Imagine if we had nurses or physician assistants beginning to take courses in surgery! Nurses and PAs add a lot to the healthcare system, but are needed to preactice their profession and be partners with doctors, not try to become one through CEUs. Of course, if they really want to be a doc, go to medical scholl. If a massage therapist really wants to be an ergonomist – go to grad school and pursue certification through the BCPE.

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