Posture and force associated with long fingernails

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This topic contains 2 replies, has 3 voices, and was last updated by  genekay 6 years, 9 months ago.

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  • #37360

    Kristy
    Participant

    I searched the history of posts and did not see this topic mentioned. I am seeking information (research, articles, etc) about the impact of very long fingernails, natural or artificial, and how this affects posture and force while repetitively keying or typing. What would be an appropriate nail length for a person using a computer? Have you seen or use a nail length policy in the workplace? If so, can I have a copy of it? So far, this seems to be a challenging issue to address.

    Thank you so much!

    Kristy Schultz

    #43290

    burt
    Participant

    Hi Kristy:

    Here is a sumary of a study done on fingernail length, force and ROM. Caroline Jansen was last working at UT Medical Center. Perhaps you could contact her.

    Contact:

    Caroline W. Stegink Jansen, PT, PhD

    Associate Professor

    UTMB, SAHS, Department of Physical Therapy

    301 University Blvd

    Galveston, TX 77555-1144

    Phone: (409) 772-9494

    Fax: (409) 747-1613

    Email: cjansen@utmb.edu

    Effects of fingernail length on finger and hand performance

    Auteurs : STEGINK JANSEN CW ; PATTERSON R ; VIEGAS SF

    J.HAND THER. (Revue )

    Date de parution : 2000

    Nbre/N

    #43291

    genekay
    Participant

    Hi Kristy,

    Emil Pascarelli discussed this issue in his 1994 book titled “Repetitive Strain Injury: A computer users guide”. In here he states that long nails force the user to type with the fingers in an extended position. This results in co-contraction of the extensor muscles (holding the finger straight) and the flexor muscles (trying to make the finger hit the keys). The extensors are thus held in a static contraction while the flexors must work extra hard to over come the tense extensors.

    It is very difficult to type with the fingers in a relaxed curled position if you have long nails. A hard nail does not give the same control or tactile feedback that one gets from the flesh of the finger tip.

    Hope this helps,

    regards,

    gene

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